While the rest of Texas sees rising cases, El Paso is seeing a low amount of cases, why?

According to the Texas Tribune, most of Texas' 254 counties saw a rise in COVID-19 cases in July and August thanks to the Delta variant, but El Paso kept their numbers low by having a majority of their county get the vaccine.

El Paso was seeing their peak in November 2020 at 1,100 hospitalizations, last week that number was down to 127.

The city has not seen over 200 hospitalizations since March 2021 according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The hospital in El Paso is seeing an increase in patients, but those patients are having non-COVID related issues.

“We do have a surge of patients but not to the extent that other parts of Texas are having,” said Wanda Helgesen, Director of BorderRAC, the state's regional advisory council for local hospitals.

Helgesen says the reason for the low COVID hospitalization numbers is because of their high vaccination rate.

The number of positive COVID tests in El Paso is right around 6% while the state is seeing a positivity rate of three times that at 18%.

The unvaccinated are the cause of the huge numbers of COVID patients across the state, they are averaging between 20-30% of the people taking up beds in other Texas hospitals while El Paso only had 7% of unvaccinated patients taking up hospital beds in their city.

That is just more proof that the vaccine works and brings the numbers down in areas where the majority of people have gotten vaccinated. Just get the damn shot.

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